Santa Rosa Dental Group

Santa Rosa dentist Dr. Dinu Gray sharing some dental tips and funnies throughout the week - enjoy!

How Many Tooth-Related Holidays Are There? The Answer May Surprise You

How Many Tooth-Related Holidays Are There? The Answer May Surprise You

Dentist Only Parking

Credit: myparkingsign.com

It may surprise you that March 6 is a national holiday, since there were no greeting cards, special foods, or huge fireworks displays. Yes, I’m talking about National Dentists’ Day. And while a sugar-laden cake might not have been appropriate for the men and women who face cavities all day, I, for one, would not have turned down a few fireworks, though they might have to…

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— 5 months ago
#Hydienist  #National Brush Day  #National Toothache Day 
New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dentist/dentists-revealing-history-blue-eyes-bubonic-plague/How Dentists are Revealing History: Blue Eyes and Bubonic Plague  http://www.geologysuperstore.com
This past week saw significant media interest in two very different pieces of historical news. While the discoveries couldn’t be more dissimilar, the methods used were exactly the same and both involved the realm of dentistry. In each case, DNA was extracted from the molar of an ancient body and archaeologists and other scientists then used the DNA to shed light on ancient mysteries. However, as I mentioned, the two cases are almost ridiculously different, as they involve shedding light on how ancient humans lived and how large amounts of humans died. Here is each case and where the magic of dentistry fits into the story.
CASE ONE: The Ancient Hunter
In the first case, a study printed in the January 26th issue of the journal Nature details a process shows what a 7,000-year-old man living in what is now modern Spain would have looked like in great detail. While scientists have unearthed skeletons that are that age and older, and have been able to hypothesize, the ability to seek very specific answer was “hidden” within the bones themselves. While 7,000-year-old bones no longer contained the DNA necessary to make the discoveries, the individual’s teeth, which in life would be filled with blood vessels, had enough DNA for scientists to sequence the individual’s entire genome. This allowed the scientists to assemble an arresting visual of an ancient hunter with darker skin and blue eyes, scientifically supported by the individual’s DNA, and paint a picture that appeared with every news article on the subject – something impossible without the help of a friendly, neighborhood dentist.
CASE TWO: The Plague Returns… Safely?
The Plague of Justinian, which began in 541AD and occurred in cycles until roughly 750AD, is considered one of the deadliest plagues in history, is responsible for killing between 25 and 100 million individuals, and may have contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire. Housing developers outside Munich recently contacted archaeologists when they stumbled upon an ancient grave. The grave contained plague victims, who still had enough DNA in their dental pulp for strains of the Justinian Plague to be identified. The findings from this tooth DNA also allowed the scientists to discover that the Justinian Plague strain was an “evolutionary dead end,” and is no longer found in the wild. The Bubonic plague, a related strain of Y. pestis that we know now thanks to this research is not identical to the Justinian Plague, is still found in the modern world.
Many people probably don’t envision a dentist as being involved in solving a 7,000-year-old mystery, but we’re as curious about the past as anyone else.

New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dentist/dentists-revealing-history-blue-eyes-bubonic-plague/

How Dentists are Revealing History: Blue Eyes and Bubonic Plague

Fossil Tooth http://www.geologysuperstore.com

This past week saw significant media interest in two very different pieces of historical news. While the discoveries couldn’t be more dissimilar, the methods used were exactly the same and both involved the realm of dentistry. In each case, DNA was extracted from the molar of an ancient body and archaeologists and other scientists then used the DNA to shed light on ancient mysteries. However, as I mentioned, the two cases are almost ridiculously different, as they involve shedding light on how ancient humans lived and how large amounts of humans died. Here is each case and where the magic of dentistry fits into the story.

CASE ONE: The Ancient Hunter
In the first case, a study printed in the January 26th issue of the journal Nature details a process shows what a 7,000-year-old man living in what is now modern Spain would have looked like in great detail. While scientists have unearthed skeletons that are that age and older, and have been able to hypothesize, the ability to seek very specific answer was “hidden” within the bones themselves. While 7,000-year-old bones no longer contained the DNA necessary to make the discoveries, the individual’s teeth, which in life would be filled with blood vessels, had enough DNA for scientists to sequence the individual’s entire genome. This allowed the scientists to assemble an arresting visual of an ancient hunter with darker skin and blue eyes, scientifically supported by the individual’s DNA, and paint a picture that appeared with every news article on the subject – something impossible without the help of a friendly, neighborhood dentist.

CASE TWO: The Plague Returns… Safely?
The Plague of Justinian, which began in 541AD and occurred in cycles until roughly 750AD, is considered one of the deadliest plagues in history, is responsible for killing between 25 and 100 million individuals, and may have contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire. Housing developers outside Munich recently contacted archaeologists when they stumbled upon an ancient grave. The grave contained plague victims, who still had enough DNA in their dental pulp for strains of the Justinian Plague to be identified. The findings from this tooth DNA also allowed the scientists to discover that the Justinian Plague strain was an “evolutionary dead end,” and is no longer found in the wild. The Bubonic plague, a related strain of Y. pestis that we know now thanks to this research is not identical to the Justinian Plague, is still found in the modern world.

Many people probably don’t envision a dentist as being involved in solving a 7,000-year-old mystery, but we’re as curious about the past as anyone else.

— 6 months ago with 6 notes
#Bubonic Plague  #Dental Pulp  #DNA  #Fossil Teeth  #Plague of Justinian  #Santa Rosa  #Spain 
Is Dentistry Really the Most Suicidal Profession?It’s unclear exactly where the myth of the suicidal dentist originated. It rose to prominence in…View Post

Is Dentistry Really the Most Suicidal Profession?

It’s unclear exactly where the myth of the suicidal dentist originated. It rose to prominence in…

View Post

— 7 months ago
#ADA  #dental health and wellness  #Stress 
New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-health/dental-emergency-damaged-tooth-right-now/Dental Emergency: What To Do For A Damaged Tooth Right NowDiscover Magazine recently printed an article covering the latest news on one of the most important topics that we don’t always talk to our patients about, because we never know when it might come in handy. Yes, I’m discussing the emergency action you should take in the event that you end up with a knocked out tooth. Any season with a number of festivities, be it winter or summer, leaves the calendar open for opportunities that lead to this phenomenon, including pick up football games, strange foods, and just tripping on the unfamiliar steps at the homes of friends and relatives. When a tooth gets chipped, broken, or knocked out, every minute counts, which is why reading this article right now could save you your tooth, instead of spending the minutes to Google instructions when the incident happens. Here’s what you need to know now so that you can be the hero of a celebration’s dental emergency later.
Know the problem you’re facingA cracked tooth is obviously significantly different than a broken tooth, which is also different treatment than a knocked out tooth. A cracked tooth may simply require pain-relieving measures until an individual can see their dentist. However, a broken or knocked out tooth will require you to do something to preserve the tooth or tooth fragment until the patient can reach the dentist.
One old wives’ tale now has scientific backingAccording to the article in Discover Magazine, storing a fragment from a fractured tooth in milk really did affect its ability to be re-bonded by a dentist. While some dismissed storing a tooth fragment in milk as simply an old wives’ tale, the study discovered that by keeping the tooth in milk or saliva as opposed to saline solution or water, the bond of the tooth fragment when reattached was actually much stronger.
There are two immediate actions for knocked out teethWhen a tooth is completely knocked out instead of cracked or broken, action needs to be taken immediately since every moment counts for keeping the tooth root alive. First, without touching the root of the tooth, attempt to put the tooth back in the socket in the mouth if it is possible and clean. This is only recommended for adults who will not swallow the tooth and if the tooth is whole. The second option is to use a commercial tooth-saving kit that is now available in many first aid kits and inexpensively at most drug stores. This may be especially useful for households with young children, as knocked out teeth cannot be replaced when an individual does not have all of his or her permanent teeth.
Now you’re prepared to save teeth in the middle of any festivity year-round, and remember to keep your dentist’s number with you for any emergency that arises.

New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-health/dental-emergency-damaged-tooth-right-now/

Dental Emergency: What To Do For A Damaged Tooth Right Now

dental emergency santa rosaDiscover Magazine recently printed an article covering the latest news on one of the most important topics that we don’t always talk to our patients about, because we never know when it might come in handy. Yes, I’m discussing the emergency action you should take in the event that you end up with a knocked out tooth. Any season with a number of festivities, be it winter or summer, leaves the calendar open for opportunities that lead to this phenomenon, including pick up football games, strange foods, and just tripping on the unfamiliar steps at the homes of friends and relatives. When a tooth gets chipped, broken, or knocked out, every minute counts, which is why reading this article right now could save you your tooth, instead of spending the minutes to Google instructions when the incident happens. Here’s what you need to know now so that you can be the hero of a celebration’s dental emergency later.

Know the problem you’re facing
A cracked tooth is obviously significantly different than a broken tooth, which is also different treatment than a knocked out tooth. A cracked tooth may simply require pain-relieving measures until an individual can see their dentist. However, a broken or knocked out tooth will require you to do something to preserve the tooth or tooth fragment until the patient can reach the dentist.

One old wives’ tale now has scientific backing
According to the article in Discover Magazine, storing a fragment from a fractured tooth in milk really did affect its ability to be re-bonded by a dentist. While some dismissed storing a tooth fragment in milk as simply an old wives’ tale, the study discovered that by keeping the tooth in milk or saliva as opposed to saline solution or water, the bond of the tooth fragment when reattached was actually much stronger.

There are two immediate actions for knocked out teeth
When a tooth is completely knocked out instead of cracked or broken, action needs to be taken immediately since every moment counts for keeping the tooth root alive. First, without touching the root of the tooth, attempt to put the tooth back in the socket in the mouth if it is possible and clean. This is only recommended for adults who will not swallow the tooth and if the tooth is whole. The second option is to use a commercial tooth-saving kit that is now available in many first aid kits and inexpensively at most drug stores. This may be especially useful for households with young children, as knocked out teeth cannot be replaced when an individual does not have all of his or her permanent teeth.

Now you’re prepared to save teeth in the middle of any festivity year-round, and remember to keep your dentist’s number with you for any emergency that arises.

— 8 months ago
#cracked tooth  #dental emergency'  #Discover Magazine  #knocked out tooth  #lost tooth 
New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-news-and-events/new-approach-dental-fear-dr-washingtons-coyote-thoughts/A New Approach To Dental Fear: Dr. Washington’s “Coyote Thoughts”I’m always interested in new thoughts about dental fear and coping mechanisms, since it’s so important for my patients and for potential patients that I hope to meet once they overcome their initial fear of entering our office. This week, I ran into one of the most unique and thought-provoking descriptions I’ve read from the point of view of a patient overcoming his fear published on Indian Country Today, appropriately entitled, “Courage and the Dentist“. I wanted to know more about the author, how he came to find bravery when facing a fear that can be all consuming for some of our patients, and what we could all learn from him. Here’s what I discovered.
The author is a pioneer in the field of Native mental health and suicide prevention.The author of the article, Beau Washington, gives a name to those overwhelming negative thoughts that lead to fear of the dentist as Trickster thoughts. He specifically names several of them, such as “I hate the dentist,” “it will hurt,” and “I hate the Novocain shot”. Dr. Washington is a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and has developed a model that weaves these stressful, painful, overwhelming thoughts and ruminations to the Native American idea of a Trickster. He changed the psychology term cognitive distortion, which are irrational or overwhelming thought patterns like dental phobias to “coyote thoughts” and set up a Native suicide prevention program for American Indians using the same name.
Trickster thoughts force you to “pay in advance” for a possibly painless procedure.One of the things Dr. Washington writes that struck me most was how he explains that a Trickster thought is simply forcing the patient to pay in advance for their fear. As he states, “I’m not going to mentally pay for it unless the pain happens”. Most, if not all, dental procedures now are entirely painless, and a topical gel can even numb a patient before Novocain is injected for more serious procedures. Yet, like many things in life, Dr. Washington is correct that we often pay in advance when we worry. Even I’m guilty of it about things that don’t involve the dentist.
Santa Rosa is incredibly fortunate to be home to the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center. If you’d like to learn more California Indian culture and history, visit this non-profit museum or read more about Dr. Washington’s pioneering efforts on Indian Country Today  or visit Coyote Thoughts on the Internet.

New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-news-and-events/new-approach-dental-fear-dr-washingtons-coyote-thoughts/

A New Approach To Dental Fear: Dr. Washington’s “Coyote Thoughts”

I’m always interested in new thoughts about dental fear and coping mechanisms, since it’s so important for my patients and for potential patients that I hope to meet once they overcome their initial fear of entering our office. This week, I ran into one of the most unique and thought-provoking descriptions I’ve read from the point of view of a patient overcoming his fear published on Indian Country Today, appropriately entitled, “Courage and the Dentist“. I wanted to know more about the author, how he came to find bravery when facing a fear that can be all consuming for some of our patients, and what we could all learn from him. Here’s what I discovered.

The author is a pioneer in the field of Native mental health and suicide prevention.
The author of the article, Beau Washington, gives a name to those overwhelming negative thoughts that lead to fear of the dentist as Trickster thoughts. He specifically names several of them, such as “I hate the dentist,” “it will hurt,” and “I hate the Novocain shot”. Dr. Washington is a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and has developed a model that weaves these stressful, painful, overwhelming thoughts and ruminations to the Native American idea of a Trickster. He changed the psychology term cognitive distortion, which are irrational or overwhelming thought patterns like dental phobias to “coyote thoughts” and set up a Native suicide prevention program for American Indians using the same name.

Trickster thoughts force you to “pay in advance” for a possibly painless procedure.
One of the things Dr. Washington writes that struck me most was how he explains that a Trickster thought is simply forcing the patient to pay in advance for their fear. As he states, “I’m not going to mentally pay for it unless the pain happens”. Most, if not all, dental procedures now are entirely painless, and a topical gel can even numb a patient before Novocain is injected for more serious procedures. Yet, like many things in life, Dr. Washington is correct that we often pay in advance when we worry. Even I’m guilty of it about things that don’t involve the dentist.

Santa Rosa is incredibly fortunate to be home to the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center. If you’d like to learn more California Indian culture and history, visit this non-profit museum or read more about Dr. Washington’s pioneering efforts on Indian Country Today  or visit Coyote Thoughts on the Internet.

— 8 months ago with 2 notes
#California Indian Museum and Cultural Center  #Coyote Thoughts  #dental phobias  #Indian Country Today  #Novocain 
Fear of losing your teeth? http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-health/teeth-falling-out-dreams/Teeth Falling Out… In Your Dreams? When To Make An Appointment?Actress Jessica Biel recently admitted to the entertainment publication Variety that she suffers from a recurring nightmare in which all her teeth fall out, and she has to “spit out hundreds and hundreds of teeth… “. The fantasy author Patrick Rothfuss, who has sold millions of imaginative books, also admitted to experiencing the same dream about his teeth on his Facebook page, where many hundreds of fans sympathized. When it comes to this somewhat terrifying dream, these celebrities aren’t alone. Here are a few reasons why you may be dreaming about your teeth, and what it means for your dental health.
First of all, it doesn’t have any direct bearing on your dental healthOccasionally, I’ll see a patient who is surprised that the damage to their teeth isn’t worse. They expect a traumatic amount of issues to be discovered at their six-month check-up when they may have just one cavity, or perhaps none. Sometimes such fears are tied to dental anxiety, or tooth sensitivity that they fear has a more serious cause, but I was surprised when one patient admitted that his fears were based on the “teeth falling out” dream. He was sheepish telling me, but I’m familiar with the dream. I was able to sooth his concerns, though, as it is not some prophetic determinant of dental issues. In fact, the chances are you or someone in your house has had the same dream as my nervous patient.
It’s the third most common dream, and it’s been analyzed for over 100 yearsFamous psychologist like Jung and Freud have been writing about this dream since the year 1900. Of course, like most things that the two men studied, they had very different opinions on what the dream might mean. Freud related the dream to issues of human sexuality, as he did many other things. Jung on the other hand related the issue of teeth falling out to symbols of rebirth and the renewing of things in one’s life, perhaps gaining meaning from the idea of a child’s milk teeth falling out and being replaced by adult teeth. Dr. Oz, Oprah’s medical guru, had a different take on the phenomenon on his website as he writes that the dream may actually symbolize psychological concern involving communication, with the mouth serving as a physical representation of your fears over anxiety related to gossiping, lying, or divulging too much or hurtful information.
However, your dental health may still be involvedWhile obviously a dentist is not a psychologist or some old-fashioned dream interpreter, it should be of note if you start experiencing these dreams after you’ve made a dental appointment or once you start experiencing dental pain. A patient’s brain may be dealing with dental anxiety by showing you a worst-case scenario that you are literally dreaming up (http://www.dreamdictionary.org/common/teeth-dreams/).
If you’re experiencing tooth pain or other sensitivity, regardless of your nocturnal storylines, make sure that you see your dentist as soon as possible. We can alleviate your anxiety in a manner that won’t cause you any nightmares.

Fear of losing your teeth? http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-health/teeth-falling-out-dreams/

Teeth Falling Out… In Your Dreams? When To Make An Appointment?

losing teeth Santa RosaActress Jessica Biel recently admitted to the entertainment publication Variety that she suffers from a recurring nightmare in which all her teeth fall out, and she has to “spit out hundreds and hundreds of teeth… “. The fantasy author Patrick Rothfuss, who has sold millions of imaginative books, also admitted to experiencing the same dream about his teeth on his Facebook page, where many hundreds of fans sympathized. When it comes to this somewhat terrifying dream, these celebrities aren’t alone. Here are a few reasons why you may be dreaming about your teeth, and what it means for your dental health.

First of all, it doesn’t have any direct bearing on your dental health
Occasionally, I’ll see a patient who is surprised that the damage to their teeth isn’t worse. They expect a traumatic amount of issues to be discovered at their six-month check-up when they may have just one cavity, or perhaps none. Sometimes such fears are tied to dental anxiety, or tooth sensitivity that they fear has a more serious cause, but I was surprised when one patient admitted that his fears were based on the “teeth falling out” dream. He was sheepish telling me, but I’m familiar with the dream. I was able to sooth his concerns, though, as it is not some prophetic determinant of dental issues. In fact, the chances are you or someone in your house has had the same dream as my nervous patient.

It’s the third most common dream, and it’s been analyzed for over 100 years
Famous psychologist like Jung and Freud have been writing about this dream since the year 1900. Of course, like most things that the two men studied, they had very different opinions on what the dream might mean. Freud related the dream to issues of human sexuality, as he did many other things. Jung on the other hand related the issue of teeth falling out to symbols of rebirth and the renewing of things in one’s life, perhaps gaining meaning from the idea of a child’s milk teeth falling out and being replaced by adult teeth. Dr. Oz, Oprah’s medical guru, had a different take on the phenomenon on his website as he writes that the dream may actually symbolize psychological concern involving communication, with the mouth serving as a physical representation of your fears over anxiety related to gossiping, lying, or divulging too much or hurtful information.

However, your dental health may still be involved
While obviously a dentist is not a psychologist or some old-fashioned dream interpreter, it should be of note if you start experiencing these dreams after you’ve made a dental appointment or once you start experiencing dental pain. A patient’s brain may be dealing with dental anxiety by showing you a worst-case scenario that you are literally dreaming up (http://www.dreamdictionary.org/common/teeth-dreams/).

If you’re experiencing tooth pain or other sensitivity, regardless of your nocturnal storylines, make sure that you see your dentist as soon as possible. We can alleviate your anxiety in a manner that won’t cause you any nightmares.

— 8 months ago with 1 note
#Freud  #Jessica Biel  #Jung  #missing teeth  #Patrick Rothfuss 
The New Science Behind A Sweet ToothWhen we have patients who experience tooth sensitivity that is exacerbated by sugary treats, or…View Post

The New Science Behind A Sweet Tooth

When we have patients who experience tooth sensitivity that is exacerbated by sugary treats, or…

View Post

— 8 months ago
#dopamine  #sweet tooth  #woman 
New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-health/jewelry-made-teeth-cant-believe/Jewelry Made of Teeth and I Can’t Believe It!  Photo: Bone Jewelry on Etsy
The fashion industry seems to really be sinking its teeth into some outlandish jewelry. When I witnessed one headline discussing jewelry fashioned from human teeth, I was a bit disturbed but chalked it up to some individual’s penchant for the next thing that pushes the envelope. But when I saw another headline this week touting tooth jewelry, I knew that, as strange as it feels to write these words as a dentist, decorative teeth had reached a larger stage.
It’s likely that the desire for such jewelry will still be limited to those who aren’t necessarily in the offices of a company with a particularly stringent dress code. However, here in Santa Rosa, we do value individuality highly so one never knows which trends might catch on.
While using teeth as decoration might seem a little strange, such jewelry has entered the world stage due to a few celebrities. First, the singer Ke$ha designed a jewelry line that includes pieces with metal casts of human teeth. The not so appetizingly named Cannibal Collection features earrings, bracelets, and necklaces that all have the same very realistic looking golden teeth. While I understand the appeal to fashion trendsetters, it just doesn’t seem like it will be on the holiday list for any of the special women or more fashionably adventurous gentlemen in my life. However, as a dentist, I do have to commend Ms. Ke$ha for choosing metal replicas instead of real teeth, thus ensuring that there will be no pathogens or genetic material involved.
While the Australian singer is still selling her metallic teeth jewelry, another more famous music superstar has taken the stage with jewelry fit for a punk rock dentist. Lady Gaga is receiving praise from a jeweler for single-handedly saving the woman’s business by wearing one of her bracelets, which appear to feature teeth, at the YouTube Awards and on the cover of a new single. The business owner says she has seen a significant uptick in business with over $2,000 in orders for the bracelets, which retail for $180. The artist’s website features several more iterations of jewelry with teeth, some metal cast, some ceramic, and some that may be real.
One artist takes the cake in this extremely strange competition, though. Australian jewelry designer Polly Van Der Glas makes jewelry from real, unadorned human teeth set in sterling silver, even including molars that already contain silver amalgam fillings. The artist has also branched out to pieces that include human hair cast in metal. When I discovered this that was about the point at which I turned off my Internet for the day and went outside for a cup of tea… then a sip of water so I don’t let the acid rest on my teeth. I know, always a dentist.
There will always be a new, boundary-pushing jewelry invention. Teeth, hair, and I hopefully won’t see the day that includes any other body part. As for me, I suppose I’m just an old-fashioned dentist. I’ll work with you to keep your teeth in your mouth and out of your jewelry box for as long as possible.

New Post has been published on http://thesantarosadentist.com/dental-health/jewelry-made-teeth-cant-believe/

Jewelry Made of Teeth and I Can’t Believe It!

teeth jewelry santarosa Photo: Bone Jewelry on Etsy

The fashion industry seems to really be sinking its teeth into some outlandish jewelry. When I witnessed one headline discussing jewelry fashioned from human teeth, I was a bit disturbed but chalked it up to some individual’s penchant for the next thing that pushes the envelope. But when I saw another headline this week touting tooth jewelry, I knew that, as strange as it feels to write these words as a dentist, decorative teeth had reached a larger stage.

It’s likely that the desire for such jewelry will still be limited to those who aren’t necessarily in the offices of a company with a particularly stringent dress code. However, here in Santa Rosa, we do value individuality highly so one never knows which trends might catch on.

While using teeth as decoration might seem a little strange, such jewelry has entered the world stage due to a few celebrities. First, the singer Ke$ha designed a jewelry line that includes pieces with metal casts of human teeth. The not so appetizingly named Cannibal Collection features earrings, bracelets, and necklaces that all have the same very realistic looking golden teeth. While I understand the appeal to fashion trendsetters, it just doesn’t seem like it will be on the holiday list for any of the special women or more fashionably adventurous gentlemen in my life. However, as a dentist, I do have to commend Ms. Ke$ha for choosing metal replicas instead of real teeth, thus ensuring that there will be no pathogens or genetic material involved.

While the Australian singer is still selling her metallic teeth jewelry, another more famous music superstar has taken the stage with jewelry fit for a punk rock dentist. Lady Gaga is receiving praise from a jeweler for single-handedly saving the woman’s business by wearing one of her bracelets, which appear to feature teeth, at the YouTube Awards and on the cover of a new single. The business owner says she has seen a significant uptick in business with over $2,000 in orders for the bracelets, which retail for $180. The artist’s website features several more iterations of jewelry with teeth, some metal cast, some ceramic, and some that may be real.

One artist takes the cake in this extremely strange competition, though. Australian jewelry designer Polly Van Der Glas makes jewelry from real, unadorned human teeth set in sterling silver, even including molars that already contain silver amalgam fillings. The artist has also branched out to pieces that include human hair cast in metal. When I discovered this that was about the point at which I turned off my Internet for the day and went outside for a cup of tea… then a sip of water so I don’t let the acid rest on my teeth. I know, always a dentist.

There will always be a new, boundary-pushing jewelry invention. Teeth, hair, and I hopefully won’t see the day that includes any other body part. As for me, I suppose I’m just an old-fashioned dentist. I’ll work with you to keep your teeth in your mouth and out of your jewelry box for as long as possible.

— 9 months ago
#art  #bone jewelry  #teeth  #tooth 
Where Was Your Dental Crown Made?On November 1st, an investigative report appeared during an Ohio-based news broadcast. A man had…View Post

Where Was Your Dental Crown Made?

On November 1st, an investigative report appeared during an Ohio-based news broadcast. A man had…

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— 9 months ago
#California Dental Association  #dental lab regulations 
The Latest On Fluoride, Part 2: A Surprising New Alternative?In part one, we spoke briefly about the issues in Marin County between the Marin County Municipal…View Post

The Latest On Fluoride, Part 2: A Surprising New Alternative?

In part one, we spoke briefly about the issues in Marin County between the Marin County Municipal…

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— 9 months ago
#ADA  #CDC  #sodium fluoride  #theobromine  #toothpaste